Tag Archives: xiphophorus

Female Red Tuxedo Lyretail Swordtail.

Fancy Red Tuxedo Swordtails

Photo: Female Red Tuxedo Lyretail Swordtail. As is typical of our strain, females don’t have as bright red coloration as males. We’ve started working on adding three fancy fin types, lyretail, hifin, and plumetail to each of our commercial swordtail, maculatus, and variatus lines. I’m going to use our Red Tuxedo Swords to demonstrate how […]

Photo of an Orange Freckled Swordtail male.

Orange Freckled Swordtails

Photo above is a male Orange Freckled Swordtail. The grid behind him is in inches and shows his size. Those of you who have read many of my past articles and blogs know that a common theme throughout my writings is serendipity (could also be called “luck”). This interesting fish arose from a mistake. The […]

Photo of a female Veiltail Blushing Swordtail.

Veiltail Swordtail

Photo: A female Veiltail Swordtail. A few months ago while processing our Blushing Swordtails I discovered an unusual female. She appeared to be a veiltail, but I wasn’t sure. Before continuing discussing that particular female, let me provide some background. Our breeding colony of Blushing Swordtails consists of lyretail females and normal males. Why is […]

Photo of a group of Blue Opal Maculatus showing two color variations.

Developing a Hifin Plumetail Blue Opal Maculatus

Photo: A group of Blue Opal Maculatus Years ago I created what I called a Hifin Blue Opal Maculatus, as its name implies a maculatus-type platy. I wrote about creating this fish for Tropical Fish Hobbyist. To read the TFH article see: http://www.tfhmagazine.com/details/articles/the-blue-opal-platy-serendipity-in-breeding.htm. I’ll provide a synopsis of the development of this fish below. Long […]

Photo of a male hifin redwag swordtail.

Introducing a Dominant Gene

Photo: A male Hifin Redwag Swordtail. I’m beginning a blog series on introducing new genes (technically alleles, but I’ll bow to common usage) into a xiphophorine population. In this blog I’ll discuss the mechanics of introducing a single dominant gene into a xiphophorine population. By the way, this doesn’t only apply to xiphophorines or even […]

Photo of a first generation Red Freckled Hifin Swordtail resulting.

Red Freckled Hifin Swordtail

Photo: A first generation Red Freckled Hifin Swordtail male in front of one inch grid to show size. Okay, it’s going to take a while to untangle the genealogy of this fish. Let’s take the female first. The pictured female is large. She’s in front of a one-inch grid that shows she almost four inches […]

Photo of a pair of Giant Redtail Blue Variatus and two mature male Redtail Blue Variatus.

Giant Redtail Blue Variatus Update

Photo: Our breeding male Giant Redtail Blue Variatus and one of his females. The two smaller fish are mature Redtail Blue Variatus. A while back I wrote about a new strain of fish we were developing (see: http://goliadfarms.com/giant-redtail-blue-variatus/). This blog gives a mixed bag of updates. The Giant Redtail Blue Variatus, as its name indicates, […]

Photo of male Blue Iridescent Swordtail

Blue Iridescent Swordtail

Photo: An early male Blue Iridescent Swordtail used in the development of the strain. We raise a variety of commercial swordtails. While these fish closely resemble the shape of the wild swordtail Xiphophorus hellerii, they are hybrid strains with genes from other Xiphophorus species such as X. variatus and X. maculatus. All three of these […]

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Sunset Variatus

Photo: Male Sunset Variatus I’ve recently begun blogging about the Variatus-type Platies we raise. For a discussion about the meaning of “Variatus-type,” check out an earlier blog I wrote about our Redtail Blue Variatus. This blog concerns our Sunset Variatus strain, which we developed independently to but is visibly identical to the commercially available Sunset […]

Photo of male Redtail Blue Variatus

Redtail Blue Variatus

Photo: A very nice male Redtail Blue Variatus either challenging another male or displaying for a female. We raise a variety of Variatus-type Platies. I say “Variatus-type” because while they look like Xiphophorus variatus (Variegated Platy), they are commercial strains and might have genes from other Xiphophorus species such as X. hellerii (Green Swordtail) and […]